Time for a cull

A great many artists will tell you that it is essential to have a cull of your work regularly, in order to keep things fresh, but it is a very difficult thing to do.    Earlier this year  I met Mark Anstee (see my blog post from January) who strongly feels that his work is temporary, and consequently, he culls regularly.
Yesterday I went to the excellent Abstract Expressionism exhibition at the Royal Academy and was delighted to see two photographs by Minor White included in the genre.   I have known about Minor White for a while, he was a mentor for John Daido Loori who I admire very much (Lee Aspland introduced me to them both) but I had not seen any of his work in person.
The prints they chose were mesmerising and I realised in an instant that I had to cull my photographic work and concentrate on the simple, zen, abstract work that I do.
So this morning I have deleted hundreds and hundreds of pictures that I have taken this year.   I have only kept the ones that made my heart sing when I saw them, and surprisingly most of them just evoked a ‘nah’ reaction – it wasn’t very difficult to do!

“One should photograph things not only for what they are, but also for what else they are.” Minor White

The featured image is “Elson, 2016”.