Liminal

What is liminality?

Liminal spaces are places of change and can be dangerous; hence, they are an apt metaphor for the spaces in our minds we are scared to cross.   I am interested in these scary places; the ideas and thoughts we avoid and so use displacement activities to continue to avoid thinking about.    I wanted to explore and convey what this felt like, using a range of media.

Bridges and ferries are liminal places, they are neither here nor there, not one thing nor another. 

The tidal areas of our beaches are liminal spaces – neither land nor sea. Liminal spaces are areas of change and as such are dangerous, chaotic places. 

Dusk is a liminal time, it is neither day, nor night….

We are currently experiencing a liminal time (temporal liminality) as the future of Britain is undecided due to Brexit.

Teen years and menopause years are liminal – neither adult nor child, fertile or barren. 

Liminality is all around us!  

This work (and more) formed my MA Fine Art degree show in 2016 at Portsmouth Historic Dockyard. 

Liminal Video

This is a cut down version of a longer video of the tide falling under Forton Bridge, Gosport in May 2016. The original is uncut and lasts 15 minutes and was shown at the Exodus MA Fine Art Degree Show in Portsmouth, August 2016 and again at the Turning the Tide, Peninsular Artists exhibition 2019.

The tidal areas of our beaches are liminal spaces – they are neither here nor there, neither land nor sea. Liminal spaces are areas of change and as such are dangerous, chaotic places. Twice daily the environment reverses and the creatures and plants that live in this liminality have to adapt and cope with the dangers of constant change. Beaches are also, in the UK especially, the border between ‘us and them’, they form our national border and feature significantly in British culture. From smugglers to pirates, the beach is a place of excitement and potential threat. Dusk is also a liminal time – neither day nor night, it is also a time of change and danger, and beauty.